I did half of the paper please just finish it. Extend to 10 pages, double spaced

I did half of the paper please just finish it. Extend to 10 pages, double spaced

I did half of the paper please just finish it. Extend to 10 pages, double spaced, times new roman, 12 pt font, and make sure to add quotes and a work cited page. You have around 5 pages left. No plagerism.
Topic: Evil in the Bible
Here is what I have so far:
In the stories of the Bible, the idea of evil is like a common thread that runs through the whole narrative, exploring the complexities of how people make choices, the consequences of those choices, and the ongoing battle between good and evil. It’s not just a recurring theme; it’s a deep dive into understanding human behavior, the fallout of disobedience, and the constant struggle between good and bad. This paper is set to take a deep dive into this concept, using a thorough examination of key stories and themes in the Bible. We want to uncover the layers of meaning in these stories, exploring the moral challenges, ethical questions, and how our decisions impact the bigger picture, all within the framework of biblical narratives. As we journey through the stories from Genesis to the Gospels, from the heavenly gardens of Eden to the frightening wilderness where temptation takes center stage, we’ll unravel the meanings hidden in these tales. These stories reveal how, despite their ancient origins, still hold valuable lessons about morality and how our choices shape our human experience.
The first instance of evil we will be discussing is one which we are familiar with which is the story of Adam and Eve. Genesis 3:1-6 (NIV) reads, “Now the serpent was more crafty than any of the wild animals the Lord God had made. … He said to the woman, ‘Did God really say, “You must not eat from any tree in the garden”?’”Eve is convinced to eat from a tree which God forbade. Satan disguises himself as a snake and speaks to Eve. Eve is shocked by this talking creature and Satan explains that he has gained this ability by eating from the forbidden tree. Satan continues to tempt Eve by expressing that God actually wants her to eat from the forbidden tree and God wants them to show independence. Eve is conflicted but her curiosity gets the best of her so she eventually reaches over and takes a bite, going against God’s rules of the Garden and giving into temptation. Eve has been subservient to Adam even before eating the apple and she wishes to be more equal. Eve wants to gain her own sense of independence which is why she struggles to tell Adam. Because of Eve’s actions Adam eventually takes a bite of the apple as well and this leads to the great fall. This was led because of the temptation Eve felt and her need to gain independence and feel more equal to Adam. This foundational narrative showcases the pervasive nature of evil, emphasizing the profound consequences of human choices and the introduction of sin into the world, forever altering the course of biblical history.
We continue to see evil in the Bible through the story of Cain and Abel. Where the jealousy between two brothers leads one to not only fall into the depths of sin, but murder the life of his own brother. Cain and Abel were the sons of Adam and Eve, the first humans created by God. The brothers had different occupations while Abel was a shepherd, Cain was a farmer. Each of them brought an offering to God; Abel presented a lamb, and Cain offered fruits from his harvest. God favored Abel’s offering because it was given with a pure heart. This made Cain jealous and resentful towards his brother. In a fit of jealousy and anger, Cain invited Abel to the field all while he was plotting to kill him. Genesis 4:8 (NIV) reads, “Cain said to Abel, ‘Let’s go out to the field.’ And while they were in the field, Cain attacked his brother Abel and killed him.” God confronted Cain about the murder, and Cain faced the consequences of his actions, marked by a curse and a life of sorrow. Cain succumbs to the negative feelings, making a grave decision to commit a violent act. Cain’s surrender to evil happens because, instead of addressing his emotions or finding a constructive outlet for them, he lets his anger fester and take control. It’s as if he allows the darker aspects of his emotions to dominate his thoughts and actions, without considering the severe consequences of his choices. This narrative serves as a poignant illustration of the profound consequences of letting negative emotions govern one’s decisions.Unchecked anger is another key element. Cain’s anger escalates to a point where he is unable to control it anymore. Rather than finding a positive way to address his feelings, he lets the anger take over, clouding his judgment and guiding him towards a destructive path.
The consequences of giving in to these negative emotions are severe. In a fit of jealousy and unchecked anger, Cain makes the tragic choice to harm his own brother. This act of violence not only ends Abel’s life but also marks Cain with lasting consequences. He becomes cursed and faces a difficult life marked by wandering and hardship. The story of Cain and Abel serves as a cautionary tale about the destructive nature of jealousy, unchecked anger, and the profound consequences of succumbing to evil impulses.
As we continue delving into evil represented in the Bible, we come across the Gospel, where Satan attempts to tempt Jesus. During this time Jesus is in the wilderness, alone and fasting for 40 days and 40 nights. In the midst of his journey Jesus had to face hunger and weakness. Where Jesus was vulnerable, he was encountered by Satan. In Matthew 4:8-10 (NIV), the narrative reaches a critical juncture where Satan, embodying temptation, takes Jesus to a high mountain. From this point, Satan reveals the glory of all the kingdoms in the world and makes a striking proposition: “All this I will give you,” he declares, “if you will bow down and worship me.” This temptation is multifaceted. Firstly, Satan tempts Jesus with the promise of vast worldly power and dominion. The imagery of all the kingdoms emphasizes the idea of authority, influence, and control over the affairs of the world. It’s a tempting offer, appealing to the human desire for influence and power. Secondly, the temptation touches upon the concept of an easier, more direct path to accomplishing Jesus’ divine mission. By bowing down to Satan, Jesus could be granted the worldly kingdoms without having to continue to face the hardships and sacrifices necessary for his divine calling. Despite feeling physically weakened by the extended period of fasting, Jesus exhibited a resolute mind and unwavering determination. His time in the wilderness was a period of spiritual preparation, self-reflection, and testing. In the face of physical weakness, Jesus maintained a strong and focused mindset, emphasizing the importance of inner strength and resilience. Jesus, remaining mentally strong, responds with “Away from me, Satan! For it is written: ‘Worship the Lord your God, and serve him only.’” This response is not just a rejection to Satan’s temptation but a reaffirmation of Jesus’ commitment to divine principles and sole worship of God. Jesus confirms that he will only bow down to God, and nothing else. The temptations in the wilderness represent a symbolic struggle between the spiritual and the worldly. This emphasizes the challenges Jesus faced when navigating Satan’s temptations and staying true to his ultimate principles. Jesus’ steadfastness in the face of these temptations becomes a timeless example, revealing the strength needed to resist the enticements of power and recognition. This serves as a profound lesson in moral resilience and the prioritization of spiritual morality over immediate but morally wrong advantages.

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