Follow-Up Post Instructions Respond to at least one peer Further the dialogue by

Follow-Up Post Instructions
Respond to at least one peer Further the dialogue by providing more information and clarification.
Minimum of 2 sources cited (assigned readings/online lessons and an outside source)
APA format for in-text citations and list of referencesMireille Nkwenti
Hello everyone,
Composition, physical characteristics and functions of whole blood. Whole blood comprises of plasma, platelets, white blood cells, red blood cells. Plasma is the liquid portion of blood and consists of water, electrolytes and proteins, hormones and waste products. Red blood cells (erythrocytes) are the most abundant cells in the blood and are responsible for carrying oxygen from the lungs to the body and removing carbon dioxide. White blood cells (leukocytes) defend the body against pathogens, infections and foreign substances. There are several types of white blood cells, each with specific functions in immune response. Platelets (thrombocytes) are cell fragments involved in blood clotting and wound healing during injury (Saladin, 2020).
Why it is classified as a connective tissue.
Blood meets the criteria for classification as a connective tissue due to its shared properties. Among them are cells, :
Blood contains a variety of cell types, including platelets, WBCs, and RBCs which connects the body’s tissues, other cells and organs. Extracellular Matrix: The plasma in blood that holds the blood cells in place.
Protein fibers: During clotting, fibrinogen and other clotting components in blood become apparent.
Blood, like other connective tissues, serves as a link between the body’s systems, transporting hormones, nutrients, and oxygen to cells while expelling wastes like carbon dioxide.
Blood’s embryonic source is the mesodermal tissue, which also gives rise to other connective tissues. It is categorized as a connective tissue due to its common developmental origin (Ferretti & Hadjantonakis, 2019).
References
Saladin, K. S. (2020). Anatomy & Physiology: The Unity of Form and Function (9th ed.). McGraw-Hill Higher Education (US). https://ambassadored.vitalsource.com/books/9781260791563Links to an external site.
Ferretti, E., & Hadjantonakis, A. K. (2019). Mesoderm specification and diversification: from single cells to emergent tissues. Current opinion in cell biology, 61, 110–116. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ceb.2019.07.012

The post Follow-Up Post Instructions
Respond to at least one peer Further the dialogue by appeared first on Scholars Hub Blog.