Examine why the rate at which death sentences were handed down, and the rate at which such executions were carried out, varied from region to region, and from decade to decade, across Britain and Ireland between the 1750s and the 1830s.

Your answer must be fully and accurately footnoted, with a bibliography, and must not be plagiarised
Your answer should be c.2,500 words in length (including bibliography) Your answer should be submitted on Loop in a Word Document with the usual cover sheet The deadline for submission is Friday, 17 November, at 5pm
1. Examine why the rate at which death sentences were handed down, and the rate at which such executions were carried out, varied from region to region, and from decade to decade, across Britain and Ireland between the 1750s and the 1830s.
2. Assess the extent to which penal transportation appears to have had consistent or varying purposes within the British Empire when viewed across time and space.
3. The modern prison was informed by an idea: ‘that under certain circumstances the character of the offender would inevitably shift from vice to virtue.’ Assess the extent to which this idea survived the emergence of modern prisons, prison systems and large prison populations.
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4. Assess what modern scholarship tells us about the relationships that emerged between modern police forces and the communities they claimed to serve, focusing on the nineteenth century in Britain and Ireland.
5. The Irish revolutionaries of the years 1917-1921 targeted the criminal justice system. Assess the extent of this and how successful it proved as a strategy.
6. In the mid-nineteenth century with the expansion of the criminal justice bureaucracy came an increasing tendency to define particular populations as dangerous and the parallel emergence of professionals claiming the expertise to identify the danger. Discuss.
7. Assess how modern scholarship explains the apparent decline in personal violence, in general, and murder, in particular, perpetrated by men.
8. Assess what the treatment of rape victims tells us about the criminal justice system
of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries,